APM – Archeologia Postmedievale, 19, 2015. Gran Bretagna e Italia tra Mediterraneo e Atlantico: Livorno – ‘un porto inglese’ / Italy and Britain between Mediterranean and Atlantic worlds: Leghorn – ‘an English port’

44,00

Author: Hugo Blake (Editor)
Year of printing: 2017
ISBN: 9788878146488
e-ISBN: 9788878146495

Description

Summaries and keywords, Abstract and Keywords: download of the file in pdf format

Livorno was a remarkably successful post-medieval creation. It became the largest transit port in the Mediterranean and created the concept of a free port in Europe. Built by the Medici Grand Dukes, it prospered as the most important trading base in the Mediterranean for the North Atlantic Powers. Chief among them was the British, whose Royal Navy ensured its commercial success and British dominance in the Mediterranean - an area that was still the source of luxury goods and goods and which provided a populous market for manufactures, metals, fish, colonial re-exports and British transport services. This volume collects fourteen contributions that give material evidence of the relationship of Great Britain with Livorno and Tuscany.

Livorno was a remarkably successful post-medieval creation, which became the greatest transit port in the Mediterranean and pioneered the concept of the free port in Europe. Built by the Medici Grand Dukes, it prospered as the main commercial base in the Mediterranean for north Atlantic powers. Principal amongst these were the English, whose Royal Navy ensured their commercial success and Britain's dominance of the Mediterranean - an area which was still the source of luxury produce and goods and provided a populous market for British manufactures, metals, fish, colonial re-exports and shipping. This volume brings together fourteen papers highlighting the material evidence of Britain's relationship with Livorno and Tuscany.

Contents
  • Editoriale
  • Hugo Blake, Preface
  • Hugo Blake, Livorno and the British – some notes

1. Commercio e difesa / Trade and defence

  • Gigliola Pagano de Divitiis, English merchants in the Italian peninsula in the long 17th century
  • June Palmer, The Italian Letters of Thomas Hill, 1657-1662
  • Andrew Saunders†, Tangier and fortified British bases in the Mediterranean
  • Cristina Bates, The role of British merchants in Livorno in the marble trade between Italy and Britain
    during the 18th century
  • Geoff Egan†, A 19th-century lead seal from Livorno excavated in London
  • Danilo Raponi, Trade and diplomacy: the Anglo-Italian commercial treaty of 1863

2. Ceramica / Pottery

  • Chris Jarrett, Lyn Blackmore, Italian pottery in medieval and post-medieval London
  • John Allan, Italian ceramics in south-west England, 1400-1750
  • Hugo Blake, Michael J. Hughes, The provenance of Tuscan pottery found in Britain: the results
    of archaeometrical research
  • Duncan Brown, Celia Curnow, A cargo of grotesque maiolica from a shipwreck off the north-west coast
    of Scotland
  • Ronald A. Coleman†, Tuscan export olive oil jars in British, British colonial, and Royal Navy contexts
    of the 17th and 18th centuries: an overview
  • George R. Haggarty, A ceramic trade from Scotland to Livorno in the later 18th century
  • Celia Curnow, Michael J. Hughes, A maiolica jar with grotesque decoration from New Street, Plymouth

Additional information

Weight :1,000 kg
Dimensions:21x29x3,0 cm
Author

Place of printing

Florence

Year of printing

Typology

Book

Pages

240

Illustrations

illustrations in black and white and color

Binding

paperback

ISSN

ISBNs

e-ISBN

Language

English, keywords in English and Italian, summarized in English, summarized in Italian

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