Uan Tabu in the Settlement History of the Libyan Sahara

35,00

Author: Elena AA Garcea (Editor)
Year of printing: 2001
ISBN: 9788878141841

Description

With contributions by Ebrahim Saleh Azzebi, Paolo Bartolomei, Louis Chaix, Mauro Cremaschi, Alexandre Livingstone Smith, Anna Maria Mercuri, Katharina Neumann, Antonietta Rizzo, Giuliana Trevisan Grandi, Luca Trombino, Dirk Uebel, Philip Van Peer, Introduction by Mary MA McDonald

Summary Uan Tabu is a rockshelter on the left bank of the central valley of the Wadi Teshuinat, which is a main ancient water course in the Tadrart Acacus mountain range. It is located in the Fezzan region, south-western Libya (Great Jamahirya). The site was discovered by Fabrizio Mori in 1960 and was re-excavated and studied by a multi-disciplinary team at the beginning of the 1990s. It has also remarkable rock art that includes paintings from the Round Head and Pastoral phases. Between 1960 and 1963, a trench was dug into the archaeological deposit at the foot of the rock wall. The results of the 1960s' excavation have never been published before, apart from some brief notes. They are thoroughly described and discussed in the present volume. Between 1990 and 1993, the excavation was resumed and extended. The 1990s' excavation has been preliminarily published. Further information and details are now presented and commented. A stratigraphic and cultural correlation between the two excavations is also attempted in this volume. Four main archaeological and paedological units were identified and dated. They spanned from the Late Pleistocene to the Late Holocene. The earliest one, dating to the Pleistocene, included an Aterian techno-complex and was dated to around 61,000 years BP. Later, during the Early Holocene, a 'pre-pastoral' occupation occurred since the 10th millennium bp. This period was differentiated in two phases characterized by different socio-cultural systems: 1. during the Early Acacus (around 9800-8800 years bp), the site was used on a seasonal basis, probably during the dry season, for practicing hunting activities; 2. during the Late Acacus (around 8800-8600 years bp), a more sedentary lifestyle was hypothesised for the inhabitants of the site. These two cultural facies comprised the upper three units. The fourth phase of occupation of the shelter was only attested to the surface of the site, but it could be still considered as an indication of the use of the site during the Late Holocene, as late as the 4th millennium bp. A dung fill in the wall of the rockshelter dated to the end of this, Late Pastoral, phase and is the only evidence for domesticated animals.

Summary Uan Tabu is a rock shelter located on the left bank of the central valley of Wadi Teshuinat, one of the most important ancient waterways of the Tadrart Acacus mountain range. It is located in the Fezzan region of southwestern Libya (Great Jamahirya). The site was discovered by Fabrizio Mori in 1960 and was rediscovered and studied by a multidisciplinary team in the early 90s. It also contains notable works of rock art belonging to the Round Head and Pastoral phases. Between 1960 and 1963, a survey was dug in the archaeological deposit found at the foot of the shelter wall. The results of the 60s excavation have never been published previously, except for a few brief news items. They are thoroughly described and discussed in this volume. Between 1990 and 1993, the excavation was resumed and extended, which was preliminary published. Further information and details are now presented and commented on. In this volume a stratigraphic and cultural correlation between the two excavations is also proposed. Four main archaeological and pedological units have been identified and dated. They cover the period between the late Pleistocene and the late Holocene. The earliest phase, from the Pleistocene age, includes an Aterian complex and has been dated to around 61.000 years BP. Subsequently, during the ancient Holocene, a 'pre-pastoral' occupation appeared starting from the 1th millennium bp. This period was divided into two phases characterized by different socio-cultural systems: 9800. During the Early Acacus (around 8800-2 years bp), the site was used seasonally, probably during the dry season, to practice hunting activities ; 8800. During the Late Acacus (around 8600-XNUMX years bp), a more sedentary organization was hypothesized for the inhabitants of the site. These two cultural facies concern the three higher units. The fourth phase of occupation of the shelter is only attested on the surface, but it can still be considered an indication of the use of the site during the late Holocene, up to the fourth millennium bp. Remains of dung found in a crack in the wall of the shelter have been dated to the end of the Late Pastoral phase and represent the only evidence of the presence of domestic animals.

NOTES

ATTACHMENTS

Contents

Commentary Mary M.A. McDonald

Acknowledgments Elena A.A. Garcea

  • The Pleistocene and Holocene archaeological sequences, Elena A.A. Garcea
  • The formation processes of the stratigraphic sequence of the site and their palaeoenvironmental implications, Mauro Cremaschi and Luca Trombino
  • A reconsideration of the Middle Palaeolithic/Middle Stone Age in North
  • Africa after the evidence from the Libyan Sahara, Elena A.A. Garcea
  • Observations on the Palaeolithic of the south-western Fezzan and thoughts on the origin of the Aterian, Philip Van Peer
  • Radiocarbon dates of charcoal samples from the Holocene sequence, Paolo Bartolomei and Antonietta Rizzo
  • The material culture from the 1960-63 excavation, Elena A.A. Garcea
  • The Early and the Late Acacus material cultures after the 1960-63 and the 1990-93 excavations, Elena A.A. Garcea
  • Pottery manufacturing processes: reconstruction and interpretation, Alexandre Livingstone Smith
  • Combustion structures as a Late Acacus feature Elena A.A. Garcea
  • Palynological analyses of the late Pleistocene, Early Holocene and Middle Holocene layers, Anna Maria Mercuri and Giuliana Trevisan Grandi
  • Preliminary analyses of fruits, seeds and few plant macrofossils from the Early Holocene sequence, Anna Maria Mercuri
  • The cold Early Holocene in the Acacus: evidence from charred wood,
  • Katharina Neumann and Dirk Uebel
  • The faunal remains from the 1960-63 excavation, Louis Chaix
  • Cultural adaptations at Uan Tabu from the Upper Pleistocene to the Late Holocene, Elena A.A. Garcea

Bibliography
Arabic summary, Ebrahim Saleh Azzebi

Additional information

Weight :1,112 kg
Dimensions:30,5x21,5x1,8 cm
Author

Number and series

2

Place of printing

Florence

Year of printing

Typology

Book

Pages

XXIV + 256

Illustrations

illustrations in black and white

Binding

paperback

ISSN

ISBNs

Language

English, summarized in Arabic

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