Posted on

18 Conference of the International Workgroup for Palaeoethnobotany Lecce, 3-8 June 2019

Locandina, IWGP, Lecce 2019.

Scarica il programma in formato pdf: programma-iwgp-lecce-2019.

 

18 T H CONFERENCE OF THE INTERNATIONAL WORKGROUP FOR PALAEOETHNOBOTANY – Conference Program

MONDAY 3 JUNE 2019
08.30 – 09.30 Reception
09.30 – 10.30 Introduction and welcome
10.30 – 11.00 Coffee break
11.00 – 12.00 In Memory of M. Follieri & G. Hillman
Session 1: ORIGINS AND DIFFUSION OF CULTIVATED PLANTS (Building 6, Room 7)
12.00 – 12.15 FULLER D.Q.,
Secondary domestication of grain crops: parallelisms evolving under entrenched farming 12.15 – 12.30 GOPHER A., ABBO S.,
The cultural distinction between plant domestication and crop evolution: The question of Resolution
12.30 – 12.45 WEIDE A., RIEHL S., ZEIDI M., CONRAD N.J.
Pre-agricultural subsistence strategies in the Early Neolithic of the Zagros Mountains: moving beyond a focus on the “wild progenitor species”
12.45 – 13.00 LONGFORD C., STEWART K., JONES G., WALLACE M., BROWN T.
ADAPT: Spread of Crops in Neolithic Europe
13.00 – 14.30 Lunch
14.30 – 14.45 ENDO E., NASU H., GASKEVYCH D., YANEVICH A., et alii
Ukraine as the crossroad for agricultural dispersal in Eurasia
14.45 – 15.00 FILIPOVIĆ D., MEADOWS J., DAL CORSO M., EFFENBERGER H., et alii
Ex Oriente seges: the arrival and establishment of broomcorn millet in Europe
15.00 – 15.15 TENGBERG M., WILLCOX G., ROUSOU M., DOUCHE’ C., PARES A.
Vegetation and plant exploitation at Pre-Pottery Neolithic Ayios Tychonas-Klimonas with special focus on the introducing of crop plants from the continental Near East
15.15 – 15.30 MOSULISHVILI M.,BEDOSHVILI D., RUSISHVILI N., MAISAIA I.
Georgia, the South Caucasus as the Origin Place of Triticum spelta
15.30 – 15.45 CASTILLO C.
Agricultural transitions in Prehistoric Southeast Asia: switching from dryland to wetland rice economies
15.45 – 16.00 HUNT H., KRZYZANSKA M., CREMA E., JONES M.
Crops, Pollinators and People: constraints on the origins and spread of buckwheat
16.00 – 16.15 MARTIN L., HERRSCHER E., RUSISHVILI N., LEBEDEVA E., et alii
Was millet domesticated in the Caucasus? First appearance of Panicum miliaceum and Setaria italica: an archaeobotanical and isotopic approach
16.15 – 16.45 Coffee break
16.45 – 17.00 JESUS A., BONHOMME V., EVIN A., IVORRA S., et alii
The status of Papaver somniferum as a crop in Neolithic Europe. First results of the application of geometric morphometrics to distinguish between wild and domestic seeds
17.00 – 17.15 SALAVERT A., ZAZZO A., ANTOLÍN F., MARTIN L., et alii
New Radiocarbon dates for the early dispersal of Opium poppy (Papaver somniferum L.) in Western Europe
17.15 – 17.30 PAGNOUX C., BOUBY L., BONHOMME V., IVORRA S., et alii
Grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.) domestication and viticulture history in Greece from Neolithic to the Archaic period: insights from geometric morphometric analyses of archaeological grape seeds
17.30 – 17.45 EL DORRY M.A., BOUCHAUD C., PAGNOUX C., REDON B., et alii
Agriculture-Viticulture in the New Kingdom-Early Roman Egyptian Delta
17.45 – 18.00 NASU H.
Domestication of soybean, azuki, and barnyard millet in Japan
18.00 – 18.15 BOUCHAUD C., DABROWSKI V., DAL-PRÀ P., et alii
Absolute chronology of cotton dispersal in Arabia and Africa
18.15 – 18.30 SPENGLER III R.S.
Shifting Seed-Dispersal mechanisms during Early plant domestication
18.30 – 18.45 WALLACE M., MARTIN P., RUSSELL J., BONHOMME V., et alii
Going beyond barley: adaptation and importation of barley varieties to Northern Scotland
18.45 – 19.00 ANDREASEN M. H.
Parallel worlds in the Neolithic: Costal hunter-gatherers in Southern Scandinavia. An interdisciplinary investigation of the Pitted Ware Culture

TUESDAY 4 JUNE 2019
Session 1: ORIGINS AND DIFFUSION OF CULTIVATED PLANTS (Building 6, Room 7)
08.30 – 08.45 STEVENS C.
Identifying the processes of selection in the evolution of domesticated millets in Northern China
08.45 – 09.00 HOVSEPYAN R.
On plant economy in the Middle Bronze age in the South Caucasus
09.00 – 09.15 MUELLER-BIENIEK A., KAPCIA M., MOSKAL-DEL HOYO M., NOWAK M.
Plant used by people of the Funnel Beaker cuture at Mozgawa site, S Poland
09.15 – 09.30 MINKEVICIUS K.
From Hilltops to Hillforts: Archaebotany of Prehistoric settlements in the South-East
Baltic
09.30 – 09.45 ANTOLÍN F., STEINER B.L., MARTÍNEZ-GRAU H., ROTTOLI M., et alii
Early farmers in the Southern Alps: results of the Archaeobotanical investigation of the lakeshore site of Isolino Virgina (Varese, Lombardy)
09.45 – 10.00 TOULEMONDE F., DAOULAS G., BONNAIRE E., RIQUIER V., et alii
A brief history of plants in a region of Northeastern France: 6,000 years of crop introduction in the Plain of Troyes, Champagne, France
10.00 – 10.15 KREUZ A., POMÁZI P., OSZTÁS A., OROSS K., et alii
Agricultural and dietary strategies as cultural decisions? Archaeobotanical results from 58 Neolithic sites of the Linearbandkeramik, Late Starčevo, Late Körös, Alföld Linearbandkeramik and Szakálhát distribution areas (D, AU, HUN)
10.15 – 10.30 SARPAKI A.
Neolithic Farming at Knossos: revisiting older archaeobotanical material
10.30 – 11.00 Coffee break
11.00 – 11.15 FAIRBAIRN A.S.
Revision of the crop history of Aceramic Neolithic Canhasan III, Karaman, Turkey
11.15 – 11.30 ULAŞ B.
The Contribution of the İstanbul-Yenikapı archaeobotanical remains to the Discussion on Agriculture Origin and Diffusion
Session 3: INTEGRATED AND INTERDISCIPLINARY APPROACHES (Building 6, Room 7)
11.30 – 11.45 BISHOP R. R., CHURCH M. J., TAYLOR B., GRAY-JONES A., WARREN G. M.
Nuts about the Mesolithic? Experimental and archaeological insights into hazelnut
taphonomy
11.45 – 12.00 DILKES-HALL I.E., DAVIS J., MALO H.
Using experimental archaeology to understand the archaeobotanical record: a multi-proxy investigation of mid-Holocene fruit processing in Gooniyandi Country, Northwest Australia
12.00 – 12.15 BERIHUETE AZORÍN M., STIKA H.-P., VALAMOTI S.M.
Distinguishing ripe spelt from processed green spelt (Grünkern): Methodological aspects and the case of Hochdorf (Vaihingen a.d. Enz, Germany)
12.15 – 12.30 VALAMOTI S.M., MARIA S., PETRIDOU C., HEISS A.G., et alii
Sitos: an interdisciplinary investigation of ‘cereal food’ in the ancient Greek world integrating literary sources, experimentation, food science, archaeobotany and scanning electron microscopy
12.30 – 12.45 AGUIRRE C., PARRA L., PIQUÉ R.
Ethnoarchaeology of agroecological farming systems in the Equatorial Andes: from the system context of agrobiodiversity to the formation of archaobotanical carpological contexts
12.45 – 13.00 BUFFINGTON A.
Pastoral Economies in the Old World Tropics and millet exploitation
13.00 – 14.30 Lunch
14.30 – 14.45 VIGNOLA C., MASI A., SADORI L.
Three-thousands-years record of climate and agriculture in Turkey: the stable isotopes approach to plant remains from Arslantepe
14.45 – 15.00 MCCLATCHIE M.
Investigating places of assembly in later prehistoric Ireland through isotopic analysis of charred cereal grains
15.00 – 15.15 STROUD E., BOGAARD A., MCKERRACHER M.
Investigating the emergence of Early Medieval English open field agriculture using crop stable isotopes and functional weed ecology
15.15 – 15.30 WARHAM G.
Functional attributes as a tool for understanding the process of cereal and pulse domestication
15.30 – 15.45 POKORNÁ A., KOČÁR P.
Immigration history of synanthropic flora in Central Europe – Implication for better understanding
of changes in agricultural system
15.45 – 16.00 FUKS D., DUNSETH Z. C., LANGGUT D., BUTLER H., et alii
Dung in the dumps: a comparative study of seeds, phytoliths and pollen in dung pellets and refuse deposits at Early Islamic Shivta, Negev, Israel
16.00 – 16.15 TOLAR T., GALIK A., ROSENBERG E., LE BAILLY M., et alii
What infos can we get from the analyses of the Late Neolithic dog (Canis familiaris) excrements?
16.15 – 16.45 Coffee break
16.45 – 17.00 Introduction to Laboratories (Introduction by Karl Hammer)
17.00 – 19.00 PARALLEL LABORATORIES:
Free Laboratory (Building 6, Room 6)
Laboratory: Naked wheat (Building 6, Room 4)
Laboratory Legumes (Building 6, Room 5)
20.00 Welcome Cocktail (Monastry of Olivetani)

WEDNESDAY 5 JUNE 2019
Session 3: INTEGRATED AND INTERDISCIPLINARY APPROACHES (Building 6, Room 7)
08.30 – 08.45 KARG S.
Interwoven – Archaeology, botany and the technical know-how of producing plant fibres in the Neolithic
08.45 – 09.00 ANDONOVA M.
Archaeobotany of Baskets of South-east Europe?
09.00 – 09.15 CARTWRIGHT L., CROWTHER A., FAIRBAIRN A., et alii
Ancient starch analysis at Neolithic Boncuklu
09.15 – 09.30 MARRERO C.S., LANCELOTTI C., MADELLA M.
Plant foodways at Çatalhöyük – a multi-proxy perspective
09.30 – 09.45 KINGWELL-BANHAM E.
Phytoliths as indicators of irrigation across Asia. Paper in memory of Dr Alison Weisskopf
09.45 – 10.00 HAGENBLAD J.
The history of barley cultivation in the Canary Islands as told by ancient and extant DNA
10.00 – 10.15 WEISS E., DRORI E.
Wine fit for a king: Identifying ancient grape varieties using a novel morphological 3D key
10.15 – 10.30 BOUBY L., WALES N., JALABADZE M., RUSISHVILI N., et alii
Tracking the history of cultivated grapes (Vitis vinifera) in Georgia combining archaeobotany, geometric morphometrics and ancient DNA
10.30 – 11.00 Coffee break
11.00 – 11.15 OUT W., MIETH A., PLA RABES S., KHAMNUEVA-WENDT S., et alii
Prehistoric pigment production at Rapa Nui (1200-1650 AD)
11.15 – 11.30 LE MOYNE C., BLEASDALE M., DESIDERI J., BESSE M., et alii
Use of Dental Calculus to discern plant use amongst pastoralists from Kadruka 1 and 21, Sudan
11.30 – 11.45 ROWAN E.
Eating in the Italian countryside: a reconsideration of Roman literary sources in light of the archaeobotanical evidence from rural sites in Italy
11.45 – 12.00 VAN AMERONGEN Y.F., KROONEN G.J.
The introduction and distribution of cultivated plants and their accompanying weeds in Europe from ca. 8000 – 800 BCE based on linguistics and archaeobotany
12.00 – 12.15 LIVARDA A., PICORNELL-GELABERT L., ORENGO H., et alii
Foodways, plant and landscape management in Minoan Crete: Palaikastro in context
12.15 – 12.30 DEMICOLI M.
The invisible fruits: the presence of fruit and nut trees in Chinese Neolithic sites as identified from anthracology
12.30 – 12.45 NORYŚKIEWICZ A.M., BADURA M., OSIPOWICZ G., et alii
Humans in the Environment: Plants and Landscapes in Mesolithic in the Paliwodzizna (Dobrzyń Lakeland, Northern Poland)
12.45 – 14.30 Lunch
Session 4: PLANTS AND SOCIETY (Bulding 6, Room 7)
14.30 – 14.45 DIFFEY C., BOGAARD A., CHARLES M., NEEF R.
‘Farming the city’: Agriculture and storage in the Bronze Age
14.45 – 15.00 ALONSO N., LÓPEZ D., CARDONA R., MORER J.
Wheat and Vine, Flour and Wine: Crop Storage and Plant Food Processing at the Iron Age Iberian settlement of Els Estinclells (Verdú, Catalonia, Spain)
15.00 – 15.15 HENRÍQUEZ P., MORALES J., VIDAL-MATUTANO P., RODRÍGUEZ A.
The contribution of the granaries of pre-Hispanic Gran Canaria (Spain, 500-1500 AD) to the study of past methods of plant food storage
15.15 – 15.30 SEABRA L., SANTOS F., VAZ F.C., TERESO J.P.
Fortified storage areas in the Late Iron Age in NW Iberia: evidence for surplus production and controlled redistribution?
15.30 – 15.45 REUTER A. E.
Is the storage running out? New approaches on the security of supply from the 6th century granary of the early byzantine city Caričin Grad (Serbia)
15.45 – 16.00 MARGARITIS E.
The Dawn of Urbanisation in Europe: mobilising the recourses of the marginal landscapes of the
Aegean Bronze Age
16.00 – 16.15 DECKERS K., TUMOLO V., GENZ H., RIEHL S.
On the significance of olive arboriculture in the Early Bronze Age Levant
Session 2: AGRICULTURAL PRACTICES AND PALAEOECONOMY (Building 6, Room 7)
16.15 – 16.30 MELAMED Y.
Underground Storage Organs as a food resource in the Paleolithic Hula valley, Israel
16.30 – 17.00 Coffee break
17.00 – 19.00 POSTER SESSION (Bulding 5, ground floor)

THURSDAY 6 JUNE 2019
Session 4: PLANTS AND SOCIETY (Building 6, Room 7)
08.30 – 08.45 HEISS A. G., GALIK A., GONZÁLEZ CESTEROS H., LIEDL H., et alii
One Man’s Leftovers Is Another Man’s Feast: Plant material from a votive pit in Terrace House 2 in Ephesus, Turkey
08.45 – 09.00 AUßERLECHNER M., PUTZER A., STEINER H., OEGGL K.
Plant use and rites at burnt-offering sites in inner-alpine areas of Northern Italy during the Bronze and Iron Age
09.00 – 09.15 FRUMIN S., WEISS E.
The archaeobotanical connection between Hera and the Philistines: Iron Age Samos and Tell es-Safi/Gath
09.15 – 09.30 CAPPARELLI A., LÓPEZ M. L.
Ceremonial maize of the south-Central Andes: a picture of variability and processing at Inka expansion times on the base of charred macroremains
09.30 – 09.45 VANDORPE P.
Food for the afterlife? Contribution of the archaeobotanical evidence in Roman cremation graves to burial practices in Switzerland
09.45 – 10.00 BADURA M., NORYŚKIEWICZ A. M., KOSMACZEWSKA A., et alii
Plants for the final journey – archaeobotanical exploration of the 18th c. children’s burials in the Holy Trinity church (sanctuary of the Divine Mother Queen of Krajna) in Byszewo (Poland)
10.00 – 10.15 MONTES MOYA E. M.
Plants-derived remains in ritual context in Qubbet el-Hawa, Aswan, Egypt
10.15 – 10.30 LAGERÅS P.
A fragrant grave – the well-preserved plants of a mummified 17th century bishop
10.30 – 11.00 Coffee break
11.00 – 11.15 MARIOTTI LIPPI M., GIACHI G.
Pollen Content of a Roman Medical Remedy (Pozzino, Italy, II cent. BC)
11.15 – 11.30 BEYDLER K.
From Farm to Pharmacy: Lolium temulentum in Roman agriculture and medicine
11.30 – 11.45 LANGGUT D.
Early Roman royal gardens: an archaeobotanical comparison between east and west Mediterranean gardens
11.45 – 12.00 RYAN P.
Lessons from the past; contextualising underutilised crops, a case study from the middle Nile valley
12.00 – 12.15 EICHHORN B., NEUMANN K., WOTZKA H. P.
The late Iron Age persistence of pearl millet in the Inner Congo Basin (ICB): Beer or food – was millet ever a staple in the African lowland rainforest?
12.15 – 12.30 ABDEEN M., HAMDEEN H. M.
Some Plants Drinking and their Religious and Social Meaning in Sudan Case study: Hulu-Mur, Abreha and Sherbot
12.30 – 12.45 STIKA H. P., MARINOVA E., HEISS A.G., ANTOLIN F., et alii
Advances in the knowledge of ancient beer brewing and reconstruction of its taste
12.45 – 13.00 DAVID M., WEISS E.
Slaves or artisans? A miner’s diet in the Southern Levant
13.00 – 13.15 HAAS J. R
Community Identity and Culinary Traditions-Foodways in the Western Great Lakes, North America
13.15 – 14.15 Lunch
14.15 – 14.30 WASYLIKOWA K., MOSKAL-DEL HOYO M., CZARNOWICZ M., et alii
Early Bronze Age plant assemblages from the Tel Erani site, Israel
14.30 – 14.45 PREISS S., CHEVALIER A., COURT-PICON M., GOFFETTE Q., et alii
They all smell the same (though…) but their content may be different: looking at Late Medieval human excrements and garbage pits in the County of Hainaut, Southern Low Countries
14.45 – 15.00 WALSHAW S.
Food and Trade at Ancient Kilwa, Tanzania: archaeobotanical and historical evidence from the ninth to fifteenth centuries
15.00 – 15.15 ERGUN M., OZBASARAN M.
Inferring plant-related activities and food plant processing at an early neolithic settlement in Central Anatolia, Aşıklı Höyük
15.15 – 15.30 FILATOVA S., KIRLEIS W.
Food production in the Bronze Age Danube River region: the case of Kakucs-Turján, Hungary
15.30 – 15.45 TOUWAIDE A.
Textual Archaeobotany. Written and Iconographic Sources for Archaeobotanical Research
15.45 – 16.15 Coffee break
16.15 – 16.45 Introduction to Workshops
16.45 – 19.00 PARALLEL WORKSHOPS:
Workshop: ERC projects (Building 6, Room 2)
Workshop: National and international archaeobotanical networks (Building 6, Room 7)
Workshop: Public archaeobotany (Building 6, Room 3)
20.00 Social dinner (Torre del Parco)

FRIDAY 7 JUNE 2019
Session 2: AGRICULTURAL PRACTICES AND PALAEOECONOMY (Building 6, Room 7)
09.30 – 09.45 WIETHOLD J., SCHAAL C.
Melon (Cucumis melo L.) – a marker of the Romanization process in northern and northeastern Gaule and the Roman provinces? Determination, agricultural history and archaeobotanical
evidence
09.45 – 10.00 DABROWSKI V., BOUCHAUD C., TENGBERG M.
The adoption of summer crops in the Arabian Peninsula: a critical review of the evidence
10.00 – 10.15 REED K. A.
A taste of Empire: reconstructing foodways in Roman Panonnia
10.15 – 10.30 KOSŇOVSKÁ J., BENES J., SKURZNA J.
What would have been the archaeobotanical signals of luxury status of the site without discovering the Americas? The case of Prague castle in the Early Modern period and ethnobotanic meaning of the new useful plants
10.30 – 10.45 MILON J., BOUCHAUD C., CUCCHI T., MILLET M., et alii
Agricultural economy and the development of cotton cultivation during the Meroitic period (4th c. BC – 5th c. AD) in central Sudan: seed, fruits and morphometric analyses at Mouweis
10.45 – 11.15 Coffee break
11.15 – 11.30 FIGUEIRAL I., CHEVILLOT P., COURT-PICON M., FORREST V., et alii
Mas de Vignolles XIV (Nîmes, Gard, Southern France): different perspectves on land use and management from the Protohistory to the Middle Ages
11.30 – 11.45 ORENDI A.
Cultivation of Flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) at Tel Burna, Israel
11.45 – 12.00 HOSOYA L. A., KOBAYASHI M., KUBOTA S., SUN G.
Rice and the Formation of Complex Society in East Asia: Reconstruction of Cooking through Pot Soot and Carbon Deposits Pattern Analysis
12.00 – 12.15 GARCÍA-GRANERO J. J., LYMPERAKI M., TSIRTSI K.
A microbotanical approach to plant preparation and consumption in the prehistoric Aegean
12.15 – 12.30 GONZALEZ CARRETERO L., FULLER D. Q.
Baking vs Boiling: the analysis of archaeological food products from West and East Asia
12.30 – 12.45 MADELLA M., GARCÍA-GRANERO J., CÁRDENAS M., et alii
Prehistoric foodways in Nothern Gujarat, India
12.45 – 13.00 BATES J., NATH SINGH R., PETRIE C. A.
A view from the villages: disentangling ‘multi-cropping’, agricultural adaptation and resilience in the Indus Civilisation.
13.00 – 13.15 CEMRE USTUNKAYA M., WRIGHT N., NATH SINGH R., PETRIE C. A.
Environmental choices of Indus people
13.15 – 13.30 BOGAARD A., CHARLES M., ERGUN M., FAIRBAIRN A., et alii
25 years of archaeobotany at Çatalhöyük: what we have learned
13.30 – 14.30 Lunch
14.30 – 14.45 ARRANZ OTAEGUI A., ROE J., PANTOS A., et alii
Locally available or imported? Identifying the provenance of Natufian plant food and fuel resources at Shubayqa 1 (northeastern Jordan)
14.45 – 15.00 WHITLAM J., BOGAARD A., CHARLES M.
Local variability in plant management and consumption at early Holocene sites in the southern Levant: new insights from PPNA Sharara
15.00 – 15.15 FLORIN S. A., FAIRBAIRN A., CLARKSON C.
65,000 years of plant food use at Madjedbebe, Northern Australia
15.15 – 15.30 BADAL E., AURA J. E., JORDÁ J. F., ZILHÃO J.
Different? The consumption of pine nuts (Pinus pinea) among the Middle Paleolithic Neanderthals and the Upper Paleolithic modern humans of Iberia
15.30 – 15.45 MARTÍNEZ-VAREA C. M.
Fruits to eat, leaves to weave. Archaeobotanical analysis of Upper Palaeolithic levels of Cova de les Cendres (Alicante, Spain)
15.45 – 16.00 KUBIAK-MARTENS L.
Processing grain and apples at the Early Neolithic Swifterbant sites in the Netherlands
16.00 – 16.45 Coffee break
16.45 – 17.00 Introduction to laboratories
17.00 – 19.00 PARALLEL LABORATORIES:
Laboratory: Image Analysis (Building 6, Room 6)
Laboratory: New Glume wheats (Building 6, Room 4)
Laboratory: Millets (Building 6, Room 5)

SATURDAY 8 JUNE 2019
Session 2: AGRICULTURAL PRACTICES AND PALAEOECONOMY (Building 6, Room 7)
08.30 – 08.45 RYABOGINA N., NASONOVA E., POTAPOVA A., SERGEEV A., BORISOV A.
Ancient and Medieval agriculture of the Noth Caucasus, Russia
08.45 – 09.00 DINIES M., PODSIADLOWSKI V., NEEF R.
Djerba Island (Southern Tunisia) about 2000 years ago: More than purple and fishes – local horticulture
09.00 – 09.15 RÖSCH M., FISCHER E., LECHTERBECK J., SILLMANN M., et alii
Field-Grass-Economy and manuring in Southwest Germany between Bronze Age and Modern Times according to on-site and off-site archaeobotanical evidence
09.15 – 09.30 OEGGL D. K., AUßERLECHNER M., ZAGERMANN M.
Food Supply of a Late Roman Castrum (450 – 800 AD) in Guidicarie esteriori, Trentino (Italy)
09.30 – 09.45 GKATZOGIA E., VALAMOTI S. M.
Archaeobotanical investigations of dietary habits and subsistence strategies in Northern Greece during the Iron Age
09.45 – 10.00 TERESO J. P., SEABRA L., COSTA VAZ F.
To be or not to be Roman: indigenous, Roman-indigenous and Roman impact in agriculture and food consumption in NW Iberia
10.00 – 10.15 MALLESON C. J.
Thirty Years of Archaeobotany at the Pyramids (Giza, Egypt)
10.15 – 10.30 KÜHN M., WICK L., ANTOLIN F., BERIHUETE M., et alii
Plant based diet and landscape management at the Late Iron Age (150-80 BC) proto-urban settlement of Basel-Gasfabrik (Switzerland) and its hinterland.
10.30 – 11.00 Coffee break
11.00 – 13.00 Conclusion and Remarks (Publication/next IWGP in 2022)
SUNDAY 9 JUNE 2019
09.00 – 14.30 Boat excursion (departure from Lecce)

Posted on

Romarchè 10. Parla l’archeologia

Prossima edizione di Romarchè 10. Parla l’archeologia, che si svolgerà a Roma dal 30 maggio al 2 giugno 2019 e, quest’anno, sarà incentrata sul tema dei paesaggi culturali.

Di seguito i temi:

Il paesaggio culturale oggi

La definizione degli elementi costitutivi e degli attributi del paesaggio culturale nelle sue più attuali interpretazioni attraverso una riflessione improntata al confronto tra ricerca ed esperienza nei territori.

Il paesaggio come patrimonio condiviso

Riflessioni e pratiche su percorsi partecipativi di sensibilizzazione delle comunità al tema del paesaggio culturale come parte integrante di un patrimonio collettivo da proteggere e valorizzare.

Nello sguardo, tra spazio e tempo

Affrontare il tema del paesaggio collocandone il valore estetico all’interno della storia dell’uomo come risultanza di una rappresentazione della realtà peculiare per ogni civiltà, in una prospettiva di dialogo interdisciplinare tra antropologia, archeologia, storia e architettura.

Vincolo e opportunità in una costruzione controllata

La gestione dinamica del paesaggio in ambito culturale presuppone uno studio attento delle pianificazioni in equilibrio tra spinte contrapposte: tra esigenze di tutela e strategie di sviluppo economico in una logica adattativa.

Scarica il programma in formato pdf: Call for papers, Landscapes – Paesaggi culturali

Posted on

Museo dell’Abruzzo Bizantino ed Altomedievale di Crecchio (CH)

Crecchio - Castello Museo

VII Premio Riccardo Francovich 2019 – conferito al museo o parco archeologico italiano che, a giudizio dei propri Soci e dei cittadini partecipanti alla votazione, rappresenta la migliore sintesi fra rigore dei contenuti scientifici ed efficacia nella comunicazione degli stessi verso il pubblico dei non specialisti. Vittoria del Museo dell’Abruzzo Bizantino ed Altomedievale – Castello Ducale – Crecchio.

Comunicato stampa

Si svolgerà dal 22 al 24 febbraio, presso il Palazzo dei Congressi di Firenze, la V edizione di TourismA, manifestazione dedicata all’archeologia ed al turismo culturale organizzata dalla nota rivista Archeologia Viva, una delle prime in Italia dedicate alla divulgazione archeologica. Nell’arco dei tre giorni si potrà assistere ad una fitta serie di eventi rivolti alla divulgazione delle scoperte archeologiche ed alla valorizzazione del patrimonio culturale.

All’interno della manifestazione, la Società degli Archeologi Medievisti Italiani (SAMI), consegnerà i premi “Riccardo Francovich”, destinati ogni anno a personaggi che si siano distinti nella divulgazione del Medioevo italiano presso il grande pubblico, e al parco o museo archeologico italiano più innovativo ed efficace nella comunicazione dell’archeologia medievale.

Per quel che riguarda i museo il VII Premio “R. Francovich” per il miglior museo o parco archeologico è stato assegnato dal voto popolare (18880 voti – 49,09%), e dai soci SAMI (123 voti – 47,49%) al Museo dell’Abruzzo bizantino e Altomedievale di Crecchio (CH).

Si tratta di un risultato eccezionale, in quanto dei 6 musei concorrenti, Crecchio ha ottenuto quasi metà dei voti espressi, con secondo il Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Cividale, con le sue preziose testimonianze longobarde, mentre gli altri quattro candidati selezionati sono molto distanziati.

Ricordiamo che il Museo è ospitato nel Castello Ducale di Crecchio (Chieti), ed espone oggetti rinvenuti durante i campi di ricerca e poi gli scavi archeologici che la Soprintendenza archeologica dell’Abruzzo ha condotto, dal 1988 al 1991 con il supporto ed in stretta collaborazione con l’Archeoclub d’Italia sede di Crecchio, con il concorso importante anche del comune di Crecchio sul sito di una villa romano-bizantina scoperta in località Vassarella di Crecchio.

L’esposizione illustra la scoperta del sito archeologico narrandone lo scavo ed il restauro dei reperti all’interno di un percorso espositivo  che costituisce il punto di arrivo di un progetto sviluppatosi nel corso di un decennio.

Una storia suggestiva che parla di coinvolgimento della comunità e di una collaborazione fattiva e virtuosa tra istituzioni e volontariato.

Nell’ambito della manifestazione è andata sviluppandosi negli anni una ampia ricostruzione del mondo bizantino in Abruzzo, con un corteo storico ormai giunto ad oltre 150 personaggi in costumi filologicamente riprodotti da veri e proprio laboratori di filatura e ricostruzione corredi storici,

Notizie di dettaglio

Dall’aprile 1995 esiste ed è aperto al pubblico nel Castello Ducale di Crecchio (Chieti) il Museo dell’Abruzzo Bizantino ed Altomedievale, struttura espositiva che perpetua la Mostra sui Bizantini in Abruzzo, aperta nel periodo Agosto-Dicembre 1993, ed è nato dallo stretto ed innovativo rapporto di collaborazione fra Soprintendenza archeologica dell’Abruzzo, Archeoclub d’Italia – Sede di Crecchio – Comune di Crecchio, grazie ad  una conven­zione approvata dal Ministero per i Beni Culturali poi stipulata il 3 Marzo 1995.

Il museo, nel quale sono ospitate le importanti  testimonianze archeologiche dall’importante scavo della villa romano-bizantina in località Vassarella di Crecchio (1988-1992), racchiude preziose ed inedite testimonianze su un periodo storico dell’Abruzzo che era sino a quell’epoca quasi ignoto, le fasi  che vedono fra VI e VII secolo la Guerra fra Goti e Bizantini e la riconquista bizantina della regione (538-39 d.C.), la fine dell’assetto antico dell’area, l’invasione longobarda (dal 579), la persistenza dei Bizantini lungo le coste della regione sino alla metà del VII secolo e lo sviluppo dell’assetto altomedie­vale della zona.

Fra essi ricordiamo reperti assolutamente eccezionali, quali la Cathedra lignea, il grabde bacile di probabile provenienza copta, un corredo di ceramiche da mensa e cucina di grande articolazione e preziosità, fra cui la celebre ceramica dipinta nota come Ceramica tipo Crecchio.

In un allestimento particolarmente moderno ed accattivante sono proposti al pubblico reperti ed oreficerie tardoromane, gote, longobarde e bizantine, unitamente ad un’aggiornatissima documentazione sulle più recenti ricerche archeologiche nella zona.

La struttura, sotto la direzione scientifica della Soprintendenza, e con il supporto del comune, è gestita per quel che riguarda la sua apertura da parte del succitato Archeoclub, che opera in stretta sinergia con le varie associazioni culturali e realtà economiche del territorio.

Da questa collaborazione è poi nata nel 2005 la ormai celebre manifestazione “ A Cena con i Bizantini”, sviluppatasi in origine nell’ambito della grande rassegna nazionale promossa dal Ministero per i Beni e le Attività Culturali-Direzione Generale per i Beni Archeologici su “Cibi e Sapori nell’Italia antica”, la cui direzione artistica è svolta dal direttore del museo, che si svolge nell’ultimo week end di luglio ed è giunta l’estate scorsa alla XIV edizione, con grandissimo successo di pubblico dovuto all’accattivante mix fra cultura, archeologia, gastronomia, e suggestive ricostruzioni d’ambiente, dovute al paziente e filologico lavori di appositi laboratori costituiti proprio dall’Archeoclub d’Italia-sede di Crecchio.

 

Li, 6 febbraio 2019

Il Direttore del Museo
dott. Andrea R. Staffa

Posted on

Ercole a Palazzo

giardino del duca
La Soprintendenza Archeologia, belle arti e paesaggio per la città metropolitana di Bologna e le province di Modena, Reggio Emilia e Ferrara e il Polo Museale per l’Emilia-Romagna promuovono un’intervista impossibile e un ciclo di conferenze collegate alla pubblicazione “Ferrara ai tempi di Ercole I d’Este

Ercole a Palazzo

Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Ferrara
Via XX Settembre n. 122
info 0532 66299  pm-ero.archeologico-fe@beniculturali.it

10 marzo (ore 10,30): Alla scoperta di Eleonora d’Aragona
Intervista impossibile a cura di Chiara Guarnieri e Marco Borella con Giulia Gabanella

15 marzo (ore 16.30): L’evoluzione e l’aspetto dei Palazzi Estensi
Conferenza di Chiara Guarnieri

22 marzo (ore 16.30): Il Giardino delle Duchesse
Conferenza di Chiara Guarnieri e Giovanna Bosi

29 marzo (ore 16.30): il Giardino Pensile di Eleonora d’Aragona e il Camerino d’Alabastro di Alfonso I: due spazi privati all’interno del Castello
Conferenza di Chiara Guarnieri

5 aprile (ore 16.30): La tavola estense: le stoviglie e il cibo. Risultati delle analisi della vasca di scarico del Palazzo di Corte
Conferenza di Chiara Guarnieri, Marta Bandini Mazzanti, Martina Demaria, Ivano Ansaloni e Aurora Pederzoli

Domenica 10 marzo 2019, ore 10.30
in occasione del finissage della Mostra “EsteViva 50 anni del Palio a Ferrara”
Alla scoperta di Eleonora d’Aragona
L’intervista impossibile a cura di Chiara Guarnieri e Marco Borella
con Giulia Gabanella

L’attenzione sulle donne legate al mondo degli estensi si è sempre soffermata su figure dalla condotta passionale o peccaminosa oppure segnate da eventi drammatici. Niente di più remoto dalla prima duchessa di Ferrara Eleonora d’Aragona, figlia di Ferrante re di Napoli, moglie del duca Ercole I  e madre di sei figli: un personaggio di primissimo piano nella Ferrara del Quattrocento.
L’intervista impossibile condotta dall’archeologa della soprintendenza Chiara Guarnieri e dall’architetto Marco Borella traccia un ritratto di questa donna straordinaria, autenticamente onesta e attentissima all’educazione dei figli, timorosa di Dio, autorevole e risoluta nei momenti più difficili, se non disperati, e al tempo stesso tollerante e comprensiva -fu ad esempio protettrice degli ebrei- in un’epoca poco incline ad ammettere la presenza dell'”altro”.

Venerdì 15 marzo 2019, ore 16.30
L’evoluzione e l’aspetto dei Palazzi Estensi
Conferenza di Chiara Guarnieri

L’incontro illustra i risultati degli scavi che hanno interessato per più di un decennio il centro storico di Ferrara dove si concentravano i palazzi del potere della signoria Estense. Sono venuti in luce i resti del Palazzo di Corte Vecchia, abbattuto nel 1479, nonché le fasi più antiche del Palazzo Ducale, con la scoperta del Cortile delle Lastre e della Loggia Grande.

Venerdì 22 marzo 2019, ore 16.30
Il Giardino delle Duchesse
Conferenza di Chiara Guarnieri e Giovanna Bosi

L’incontro con l’archeologa Chiara Guarnieri e la botanica Giovanna Bosi è incentrato sulle indagini archeologiche realizzate nel Giardino delle Duchesse che hanno permesso di delinearne l’aspetto di quest’area verde nel momento della sua realizzazione (1479).
Le analisi polliniche e botaniche hanno anche svelato le specie ornamentali e da frutto che ne ornavano gli spazi.

Venerdì 9 marzo 2019, ore 16.30
Il Giardino Pensile di Eleonora d’Aragona e il Camerino d’Alabastro di Alfonso I: due spazi privati all’interno del Castello
Conferenza di Chiara Guarnieri

L’incontro con l’archeologa Chiara Guarnieri illustra le due indagini archeologiche che hanno permesso di realizzare due eccezionali scoperte: il Giardino Pensile di Eleonora d’Aragona e le stanze relative ai cosiddetti Camerini d’alabastro dove era conservata la collezione privata di Alfonso I.

Venerdì 5 aprile 2019, ore 16.30
La tavola estense: le stoviglie e il cibo. Risultati delle analisi della vasca di scarico del Palazzo di Corte
Conferenza di Chiara Guarnieri, Marta Bandini Mazzanti, Martina Demaria, Ivano Ansaloni e Aurora Pederzoli

Lo scavo in piazza Municipale ha portato alla luce una vasca di scarico dei rifiuti del Palazzo di Corte Vecchia contenente stoviglie per la tavola, per la cucina e moltissimi resti di pasto. Grazie allo studio di questi reperti archeologi, botanici e archeozoologi hanno potuto delineare cosa e come si mangiasse alla tavola degli Estensi.

Comunicazione  a cura di Carla Conti (OdG 83183)
Ufficio stampa Soprintendenza Archeologia, belle arti e paesaggio per la città metropolitana di Bologna e le province di Modena, Reggio Emilia e Ferrara
Via Belle Arti 52 – 40126 Bologna
tel. (+39) 051 0569338
www.archeobologna.beniculturali.it  – www.sbapbo.beniculturali.it


Posted on

Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Cividale – attività marzo-aprile 2019

Museo Archeologico Nazionale - Cvidale.

Comunicato del Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Cividale

Ci aspetta una primavera speciale, con proposte e appuntamenti per tutti!

Domenica 3 marzo, una prima domenica del mese ancora gratuita con laboratorio dedicato a bambini e famiglie per imparare e divertirsi usando fili e telaio, anticipa un’intera settimana di gratuità dal 5 al 10 marzo, nella quale potrete trovare un ricco calendario di iniziative.

  • Martedì 5 e mercoledì 6 marzo ore 11.00 visita ai resti del palazzo patriarcale (con prenotazione)
  • Giovedì 7 marzo ore 17.30 incontro con Franco Fornasaro dal titolo Le antiche genti aprirà la rassegna Cerniera di popoli. Dal centro dell’Europa uno sguardo sulla storia.
  • Venerdì 8 marzo ore 17.30 incontro dal titolo Regine. Donne e potere nell’età longobarda, a cura di Angela Borzacconi.
  • Domenica 10 marzo ore 16.30 caccia al tesoro tra le sale del museo, a cura di Archeoscuola (con prenotazione)

E non è tutto qui … MARZO continua con altri appuntamenti da non perdere … e APRILE anche!

In allegato il calendario delle iniziative.

Vi aspettiamo!

Locandina in formato pdf: LOCANDINA maraprile_2019


Posted on

Catalogo generale, in formato pdf – aggiornato a febbraio 2019.

Catalogo generale, in formato pdf - aggiornato a febbraio 2019.

Sono qui elencati tutti i volumi da noi editi. Il presente annulla ogni precedente catalogo. Per aggiornamenti, integrazioni, offerte e sconti rimandiamo al nostro sito. All’interno del sito l’intero catalogo, con schede, indici, recensioni, volumi di altre case editrici da noi distribuiti e tutte le notizie riguardanti la nostra attività editoriale. Sul sito potete accedere a sconti, acquisto in abbonamento dei periodici, acquisto in formato digitale (ebook) e offerte particolari su collezioni o singoli volumi.

Per i soci della SAMI, i soci ANA e gli abbonati alla rivista “Archeologia Medievale”, sconto del 20% su tutte le pubblicazioni. Link alla pagina degli sconti: https://www.insegnadelgiglio.it/acquisti/sconti/

Visualizza / scarica il catalogo in formato pdf – aggiornato al febbraio 2019.

Contenuti

Modalità di acquisto
Ordini
Spedizioni
Pagamenti

Periodici

APM. Archeologia Postmedievale. Società. Ambiente. Produzione. issn 1592-5935, e-issn 2039-2818
Archeologia dell’Architettura. issn 1126-6236, e-issn 2038-6567
Archeologia e Calcolatori. issn 1120-6861, e-issn 2385-1953
Supplementi. issn 2385-202X, e-issn 2385-2038
Archeologia Medievale. Cultura materiale, insediamenti, territorio. issn 0390-0592, e-issn 2039-280X
Arimnestos. issn 2611-5867, e-issn 2611-5867
Bollettino dell’Associazione Iasos di Caria. issn 1972-8832, e-issn 2420-7861
Quaderni di Archeologia d’Abruzzo. Notiziario della Soprintendenza per i Beni Archeologici dell’Abruzzo issn 2239-3145, e-issn 2239-6233
SAIA, Annuario della Scuola Archeologica di Atene e delle Missioni Italiane in Oriente issn 0067-0081, e-issn 2585-2418

Pubblicazioni periodiche sospese

Annali Aretini. issn 1126-232X.
Archeologia dell’Emilia Romagna. issn 1126-1587
Contesti. Città. Territori. Progetti. issn 2035-5300, e-issn 2038-6583
NAVe. Notizie di Archeologia del Veneto. issn 2385-0213, e-issn 2385-2356
Notiziario della Soprintendenza per i Beni Archeologici del Friuli Venezia Giulia. issn 2035-5947, e-issn 2239-6225
Notiziario della Soprintendenza per i Beni Archeologici della Toscana. issn 2035-5297, e-issn 2280-3661
Supplementi. issn 2385-2046
Opus. Rivista internazionale per la storia economica e sociale dell’antichità.
Pagani e Cristiani. Forme e attestazioni di religiosità del mondo antico in Emilia. issn 2038-4904, e-issn 2281-3756
Rassegna di Archeologia. dall’1 al 17: issn 1721-6281
(serie A) preistorica e protostorica. issn 1721-629X, e-issn 2039-2826
(serie B) classica e postclassica. issn 1721-6303, e-issn 2039-2834

Serie

ANTIQVARIVM ARBORENSE. issn 2611-0024
ArcheoAlpMed – Archeologia delle Alpi e del Mediterraneo tardoantico e medievale. issn 0000-0000
Archeologia del Veneto. issn 2284-0044
Archeologia Piemonte. issn 2282-491X
ArcheoMed Monografie. issn 2465-0226
Albisola. Atti dei Convegni Internazionali della Ceramica. issn 2035-5483
AZA – Arid Zone Archaeology, Monographs. issn 2035-5459
Biblioteca di Archeologia dell’Architettura. issn 2035-5327
Biblioteca di Archeologia Medievale. issn 2035-5319
DM – Dialoghi sul Medioevo. issn 2611-4364
DAP – Documenti di Archeologia Postmedievale. issn 2035-5335
ISCUM – Biblioteca dell’Istituto di Storia della Cultura Materiale. issn 2039-067X
ISCUM – Quaderni dell’Istituto di Storia della Cultura Materiale. issn 2039-0688
Fondazione Museo Montelupo. issn 0000-0000
Flos Italiae. Documenti di archeologia della Cisalpina Romana. issn 1723-817X
Futuro Anteriore. issn 1723-4565
Grandi contesti e problemi della Protostoria Italiana. issn 2035-5440
IdA – Insediamenti d’Altura. issn 2385-166X
Materia e Arte. issn 2421-3578
Medioevo scavato. Schola Salernitana. issn 2035-5386
QUAVAS. Quaderni del centro di documentazione dei Villaggi Abbandonati della Sardegna. issn 2035-5432
Quaderni di Archeologia Medievale. issn 1973-1728
Quaderni di Archeologia dell’Emilia Romagna. issn 1593-2680
Ricerche di Archeologia Altomedievale e Medievale. issn 2035-5416
SAIA, Monografie della Scuola Archeologica di Atene e delle Missioni Italiane in Oriente
SAMI – Società degli Archeologi Medievisti Italiani – Congresso Nazionale di Archeologia Medievale. issn 2421-5910
SAMI – Società degli Archeologi Medievisti Italiani – Contributi di Archeologia Medievale. Premio Ottone d’Assia e Riccardo Francovich. issn 2035-5424
SAMI – Società degli Archeologi Medievisti Italiani – Metodi e temi dell’Archeologia Medievale. issn 2035-5408
Storia e storie dei territori. Memorie. Identità. Resistenza. issn 2282-7536
Storie di Paesaggi Medievali. issn 2531-8330
Università di Siena – Archeologia dei Paesaggi Medievali. Collana Multimediale. issn 2035-5467.
Università di Siena – Biblioteca del Dipartimento di Archeologia e Storia delle Arti. Sezione Archeologica. Università di Siena. issn 2035-5351
Università di Siena – χω˜ραι. Collana di studi regionali. issn 2035-5475
Università di Siena – Quaderni del Dipartimento di Archeologia e Storia delle Arti. Sezione Archeologica. Università di Siena. issn 2035-536X
Università di Siena – Trame nello spazio. Quaderni di geografia storica e quantitativa. issn 2035-5394

Monografie

Ambiente.
Antropologia storica.
Archeologia.
Archeologia – Atti di Convegni e Seminari.
Archeologia – Insegnamento di Archeologia Medievale. Dipartimento di Studi Umanistici. Università Ca’ Foscari di Venezia.
Architettura.
Archivistica.
Atlante dei Beni Archeologici della Provincia di Modena.
Edizioni per ragazzi.
Fonti.
Musei, guide, collezioni e mostre.
Preistoria e protostoria.
Storia.
Storia dell’Arte.
Varie.
Vetro. Tipologie e restauro.

Indice analitico

Posted on

Ancora a Canossa, 2019.

Locandina CANOSSA 2019, particolare.

15/02/2019 ore 10:00-16:00

Teatro Comunale a Ciano d’Enza, Piazza Matilde di Canossa, n. 2 Canossa (RE)

Dipartimento di Storia Culture Civiltà Centro studi di Storia dei sistemi inseditiavi, Università di Verona Dipartimento di Culture e Civiltà, Comune di Canossa, Club Alpino Italiano, Club Albinea Ludovico Ariosto, Club Canossa Val d’Enza, Soprintendenza archeologica, Belle arti e paesaggio per la città metropolitana di Bologna e le Province di Modena, Reggio Emilia e Ferrara, Polo Museale Emilia Romagna

presentano il Convegno

Ancora a Canossa. La ricerca archeologica 2018/2019

Partecipanti

C. Ambrosini, A. Quintino Sardo, G. Bandiera, C. Romano, A. Capurso, P. Galetti, F. Saggioro, E. Lerco, N. Mancassola, G. Cervi, F. Zoni, M. F.A. Cantatore, D. Morini, C. Ferretti.

Locandina CANOSSA 2019, in formato pdf, con il programma completo.